Find a parcel of land

A land parcel is an individual piece of land that can be sold separately.

You can use the Land and Survey Spatial Information (LASSI) map to find a parcel of land online. LASSI can help identify the boundary of a property and those of its surrounding properties. You can then use this information to do title searches on each land parcel.

Using LASSI, you can find out the approximate measurements of the land parcel, view or download a basic property report or find out about surrounding infrastructure such as roads and railways and natural features like rivers and lakes.

You will need to know at least one of the following to find a land parcel:

  • address
  • coordinates
  • Crown description
  • lot and plan numbers
  • Melway/VicRoads reference
  • survey label or mark.

Read the Guide to Land and Survey Spatial Information (DOCX, 3.3 MB)

Title and property boundaries

Land titles give an indication of boundary dimensions by making reference to a diagram. However, only a licensed surveyor can determine the actual location of your property boundaries.

Dimensions of common suburban properties are generally shown with a street frontage and connecting distance to a street corner.

Strata and multi-level developments often include height and depth. It is not uncommon for parcels of land in rural areas to include a reference to a river or creek when describing a boundary.

You can view property boundaries by doing a title search online or by visiting the Land Information Centre to do a title search. Please note that fees apply depending on the point of service.

When you do a title search, you will receive a title register search statement that includes:

  • current registered proprietor(s)
  • a land description
  • any encumbrances, caveats or notices, including mortgages
  • a diagram location or source (that is, where to find the sketch of the property).

If you do not have the volume and folio reference for the parcel of land you want to search, you will need to do a land index search. This will give you the volume and folio details of a land parcel when you enter an address. When you do a title search online, the system will automatically do this for you.

Changing property or title boundaries can be very complex. You will need a licensed surveyor and, in most instances, a lawyer or other legal representative.

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Property, planning and vendor statement certificates can be ordered and paid for online through LANDATA. Property reports can also be ordered online. You can also visit the Land Information Centre to access these certificates, statements and reports.

Property certificates include catchment and land management information about a property, as applicable under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994. This information may include:

  • regional catchment strategy status
  • land use conditions and restrictions.

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Planning certificates provide information about a planning scheme as it affects a property on a given date. They may include information on:

  • zoning of the land and, if applicable, overlay planning controls
  • reservations that affect the land
  • classified roads abutting the land
  • proposals in an exhibited amendment to the planning scheme.

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A vendor's statement, or a Section 32 statement, is needed when you sell a property in Victoria. A vendor's statement has all the information necessary for the sale of a property, such as a copy of the property title, site plan, council land information certificates, water rates and any building permits.

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There are different report types and depending on the property, you may need to search in a particular way to obtain  the information you need. Some reports are free, while others attract a fee.

The Basic Property Report is free and includes:

  • address details (street address, lot on plan number, standard parcel identifier)
  • the local government area and council property number
  • a street directory reference
  • state electorates (Legislative Council and Assembly)
  • utilities (power and water suppliers)
  • a planning zone summary
  • a map of the area.

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There are many types of plans that you can search for online.

Historical survey plans and field notes from other agencies are also held at Public Record Office Victoria

Parish plans define the positions and dimensions of all Crown allotments within a parish. You can search and view parish plans online through LANDATA

Plans of subdivision depict the break-up of a piece freehold land, showing parcels of land (commonly called lots) that can be sold separately.

If you know the plan of subdivision number (for example PS516128W), you can easily search for a plan online through LANDATA or by visiting the Land Information Centre where you can search, view and print plans of subdivisions for a fee.

Survey plans and abstracts of field records are certified by licensed surveyors and show a summary of information used by a surveyor to establish the title boundaries and dimensions of a piece of land.

These plans commonly show reference marks, building boundaries, fencing and measurement notations. Copies of survey plans and abstracts of field records dating from 1854 to today are available for viewing and copying for a fee at the Land Information Centre. You can print screen views at A3 size.

A collection of historical plans relating to the first 60 years of European settlement in Victoria is available online at Public Record Office Victoria.

The collection includes 8000 plans dating from 1837 and covers all parts of Victoria.

While many of the plans relate to the early land subdivision of Victoria in counties, parishes and townships, other information shown on the plans include:

  • early descriptions of soils and native vegetation
  • the location of huts
  • buildings and other improvements made by squatters
  • tracks used by early settlers
  • the location of pastoral runs
  • early place names.

The Central Plan Office is Victoria's virtual storeroom for State Government surveys and plans, as referred to in Victorian legislation.

The Surveyor-General of Victoria, under the Survey Co-ordination Act 1958, has responsibility for plans held by the Central Plan Office. All plans are protected by Crown copyright.

To view Central Plan Office plans, go to LANDATA or or visit the Land Information Centre.